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Honours Bachelors of Arts in Economics (Hons.B.A.)Degree Details

Length:
4 Years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of 3.5 (C-) including an average of 4.0 (C-) in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Honours Economics: Specialist Option (Hons.B.A.)Degree Details

Length:
4 Years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of 5.0 (C) including an average of at least 5.0 (C) in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Combined Honours in Economics and Another Subject (Hons.B.A.)Degree Details

Length:
4 Years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of 5.0 (C) including an average of at least 5.0 (C) in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3. Satisfaction of admission requirements for the Honours program in the other B.A. subject.
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Honours Economics and Computer Science (Hons.B.A.)Degree Details

Length:
4 years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of 5.0 (C), including an average of 5.0 (C) in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3, and a weighted average of 5.0 (C) in ECON 1B03, 1BB3, COMP SCI 1MD3 and 1JC3; MATH 1A03, 1AA3 and 1B03. MATH 1B03 may be postponed until Level 2
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Honours Economics and Mathematics (Hons.B.A.)Degree Details

Length:
4 years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of 5.0 (C) including MATH 1A03 (or 1X03) an average of 5.0 (C) in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3 and a grade of 7 (B-) in each of MATH 1AA3 (or 1XX3) and 1B03
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Bachelor of Arts in Economics (B.A.)Degree Details

Length:
3 Years
Required Credential:
Completion of any level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of 3.5 (C-) including an average of 4.0 (C-) in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Minor in Economics (Minor)Degree Details

Length:
N/A
Required Credential:
High School Diploma or Equivalent
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Master of Arts in Economics (M.A.)Degree Details

Length:
1 Year
Required Credential:
Honours B.A. in Economics
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Masters in Economic Policy (M.A.)Degree Details

Length:
1 Year
Required Credential:
Honours B.A. in Economics
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Doctor of Philosophy in Economics (Ph.D.)Degree Details

Length:
4 Years
Required Credential:
Masters degree in economics from a recognized university
Program Type:
Thesis based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Hons.B.A.Honours Bachelors of Arts in Economics

The BA in Honours Economics program is a four-level program that offers the challenge of more advanced work in economics.

The honours program provides excellent preparation for graduate work in applied economics, economic policy, business, law, public administration, urban planning and other professional disciplines. For example, students planning a career in business or the public sector often select the honours economics degree followed by the MBA or MPA degree. Such programs typically expect an Honours B.A. but do not require the advanced courses in economic theory. Other requirements for admission vary substantially among programs and universities.

30 units

from

  • the Level I program completed prior to admission to the program. (See Admission above.)

18 units

24 units

Levels II, III, IV Economics with no more than six units from the following courses

3 units

from

3 units

from

3 units

from

3 units

from

36 units

  • Electives. The number of units of Economics courses above Level I (excluding ECON 2B03, 3WW3 and 3U03) must not exceed 60.

* If requirement was completed in Level I or with Grade 12 U courses, these units will be taken as electives.

Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of 3.5 (C-) including an average of 4.0 (C-) in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3.

For continuation in program, see the section on Minimum Requirements for Entering and Continuing in a Program Beyond Level I.

If a student misses the cut-off for enrolling in Level 2 Honours, he or she can enrol in the BA program for level II. The student can transfer to Honours when entering Level 3 if the GPA is at least 5.0 and the student has an average of at least 5.0 in the four intermediate theory courses ECON 2G03, 2GG3, 2H03 and 2HH3.  The student can transfer to Honours-Specialist Option when entering Level 3 if the GPA is at least 5.0 and the student has an average of at least 6.0 in the four intermediate theory courses ECON 2G03, 2GG3, 2H03 and 2HH3 with a grade of at least C in each of ECON 2GG3 and 2HH3.

To remain in programs beyond Level 2, and to graduate from them, students must maintain a GPA of at least 5.0 for the Honours B.A.

Undergraduate Scholarships, Bursaries and Awards

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

Economics students are eligible for more than fifteen Scholarships and Awards.

Academic Counseling

Department counselors are available to help answer students’ questions about course selection and degree requirements. Most questions can be handled by email. Please contact the Chair of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Marc-André Letendre, with your inquiries at econugchair@mcmaster.ca. To meet with a counselor please refer to the schedule below.

January to April 2017

DAY

PROFESSOR

TIME

OFFICE

MONDAY

O’SHAUGHNESSY

11:00 - 12:00 KTH/403

TUESDAY

JEFFERSON 2:00 – 3:00 KTH/403

WEDNESDAY

HOLMES 1:30 – 2:30 KTH/442

THURSDAY

LETENDRE

1:00 – 2:00

KTH/410

 

Economics Clinics

Students having academic difficulties are encouraged to seek the help not only of their instructors and teaching assistants but also from clinics run by the Department of Economics and from the Student Success Centre. The Department of Economics provides an economics clinic that is run by graduate students who can help undergrad students having difficulties with first and second year courses.

The Economics Clinic will run from Monday, January 9 to Thursday, April 6 in the Winter term.

MONDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

TUESDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

WEDNESDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

THURSDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

  • ECON 1B03 - Introductory Microeconomics
  • ECON 1BB3 - Introductory Macroeconomics
  • ECON 2A03 - Economics of Labour-Market Issues
  • ECON 2B03 - Analysis of Economic Data
  • ECON 2CC3 - Health Economics and its Application to Health Policy
  • ECON 2D03 - Economic Issues
  • ECON 2F03 - The Political Economy of Development
  • ECON 2G03 - Intermediate Microeconomics I
  • ECON 2GG3 - Intermediate Microeconomics II
  • ECON 2H03 - Intermediate Macroeconomics I
  • ECON 2HH3 - Intermediate Macroeconomics II
  • ECON 2I03 - Financial Economics
  • ECON 2J03 - Environmental Economics
  • ECON 2K03 - Economic History of Canada
  • ECON 2N03 - Public Policy Toward Business
  • ECON 2P03 - Economics of Professional Sports
  • ECON 2Q03 - Economics of Bad Behaviour
  • ECON 2T03 - Economics of Trade Unionism and Labour
  • ECON 2X03 - Applied Business Economics
  • ECON 3B03 - Public Sector Economics: Expenditures
  • ECON 3C03 - Public Sector Economics: Taxation
  • ECON 3D03 - Labour Economics
  • ECON 3F03 - Methods of Inquiry in Economics
  • ECON 3FF3 - Research Methods in Economics
  • ECON 3G03 - Introduction to Advanced Economic Theory
  • ECON 3H03 - International Monetary Economics
  • ECON 3HH3 - International Trade
  • ECON 3K03 - Monetary Economics
  • ECON 3LL3 - History of Economic Theory
  • ECON 3M03 - Introduction to Game Theory
  • ECON 3Q03 - The Economics of Aging
  • ECON 3R03 - The History of Economic Growth
  • ECON 3S03 - Industrial Organization
  • ECON 3T03 - Economic Development
  • ECON 3U03 - Econometrics I
  • ECON 3W03 - Natural Resources
  • ECON 3WW3 - Applied Econometrics
  • ECON 3Y03 - Selected Topics
  • ECON 3Z03 - Health Economics
  • ECON 4A03 - Honours Economic Analysis
  • ECON 4AA3 - Economic Specialist Seminar
  • ECON 4B03 - Selected Topics
  • ECON 4G03 - Econometrics II
  • ECON 4M06 A/B - Direct Research 1
  • ECON 4N03 - Directed Research II
  • ECON 4T03 - Advanced Economic Theory I
  • ECON 4TT3 - Advanced Economic Theory II
Undergraduate Calendar | Economics Programs Economics Course Descriptions McMaster Economics Society
For more information:
Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Undergraduate Program
KTH 426
905-525-9140 ext. 22765
econug@mcmaster.ca
Length:
4 Years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of 3.5 (C-) including an average of 4.0 (C-) in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
N/A

Hons.B.A.Honours Economics: Specialist Option

Honours BA Specialist Option stream provides the same, solid grounding in Economics as the Honours BA stream, with a minimal but highly specific differentiation. The Specialist Option requires an additional econometrics course that is necessary preparation for econometrics courses to be taken in MA in Economics programs.

A key distinction between streams is the required econometrics course. Students in the Honours stream take Applied Econometrics (ECON 3WW3) while students in the Specialist Option take Econometrics I (ECON 3U03). ECON 3WW3 is less mathematically demanding (less emphasis on probability and statistic theory) and focuses more on the application of econometrics techniques than ECON 3U03. The mathematical treatment in ECON 3U03 provides students with the necessary preparation for econometrics courses to be taken in MA in Economics programs. Hence students who consider pursuing an MA in Economics after graduation should take ECON 3U03 and the Specialist Option.

Another key distinction between streams resides in the required level III research methods course and the level IV capstone course. Students in the Honours stream take Methods of Inquiry in Economics (ECON 3F03) and Honours Economic Analysis (ECON 4A03) where they write short paper reviews and short papers analysing
current economic issues. Students in the Honours-Specialist Option take Research Methods in Economics (ECON 3FF3) and Economic Specialist Seminar (ECON 4AA3) where they present and discuss papers and write, under the supervision of a faculty member, a paper containing original research.

It is important to plan the final years of your program in advance. MA programs in economics expect students to have a B+ average in levels III and IV. Many but not all M.A. programs in economics expect that students have already taken advanced theory courses at the undergraduate level (Economics 3G03, 4T03 and 4TT3 at McMaster). At McMaster, admission to the regular M.A. in Economics requires these three courses but admission to the M.A. in Economic Policy does not. Economics 3G03 is a prerequisite for Economics 4T03 and Economics 4TT3 and is offered each year in the fall term. The two theory courses are offered in the winter term. Students considering an M.A. in economics are advised to consult with a departmental counsellor.

30 units

from

  • the Level I program completed prior to admission to the program.

21 units

24 units

Levels II, III, IV Economics with no more than six units from the following courses:

3 units

3 units

from

3 units

from

36 units

  • Electives. The number of units of Economics courses above Level I (excluding ECON 2B033WW3 and 3U03) must not exceed 60.


* If requirement was completed in Level I or with Grade 12 U courses, these units will be taken as electives.

Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of 5.0 (C) including an average of at least  5.0 (C) in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3. For continuation in program, see the section on Minimum Requirements for Entering and Continuing in a Program Beyond Level 1.

Undergraduate Scholarships, Bursaries and Awards

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

Economics students are eligible for more than fifteen Scholarships and Awards.

Academic Counseling

Department counselors are available to help answer students’ questions about course selection and degree requirements. Most questions can be handled by email. Please contact the Chair of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Marc-André Letendre, with your inquiries at econugchair@mcmaster.ca. To meet with a counselor please refer to the schedule below.

January to April 2017

DAY

PROFESSOR

TIME

OFFICE

MONDAY

O’SHAUGHNESSY

11:00 - 12:00 KTH/403

TUESDAY

JEFFERSON 2:00 – 3:00 KTH/403

WEDNESDAY

HOLMES 1:30 – 2:30 KTH/442

THURSDAY

LETENDRE

1:00 – 2:00

KTH/410

 

Economics Clinics

Students having academic difficulties are encouraged to seek the help not only of their instructors and teaching assistants but also from clinics run by the Department of Economics and from the Student Success Centre. The Department of Economics provides an economics clinic that is run by graduate students who can help undergrad students having difficulties with first and second year courses.

The Economics Clinic will run from Monday, January 9 to Thursday, April 6 in the Winter term.

MONDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

TUESDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

WEDNESDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

THURSDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

  • ECON 1B03 - Introductory Microeconomics
  • ECON 1BB3 - Introductory Macroeconomics
  • ECON 2A03 - Economics of Labour-Market Issues
  • ECON 2B03 - Analysis of Economic Data
  • ECON 2CC3 - Health Economics and its Application to Health Policy
  • ECON 2D03 - Economic Issues
  • ECON 2F03 - The Political Economy of Development
  • ECON 2G03 - Intermediate Microeconomics I
  • ECON 2GG3 - Intermediate Microeconomics II
  • ECON 2H03 - Intermediate Macroeconomics I
  • ECON 2HH3 - Intermediate Macroeconomics II
  • ECON 2I03 - Financial Economics
  • ECON 2J03 - Environmental Economics
  • ECON 2K03 - Economic History of Canada
  • ECON 2N03 - Public Policy Toward Business
  • ECON 2P03 - Economics of Professional Sports
  • ECON 2Q03 - Economics of Bad Behaviour
  • ECON 2T03 - Economics of Trade Unionism and Labour
  • ECON 2X03 - Applied Business Economics
  • ECON 3B03 - Public Sector Economics: Expenditures
  • ECON 3C03 - Public Sector Economics: Taxation
  • ECON 3D03 - Labour Economics
  • ECON 3F03 - Methods of Inquiry in Economics
  • ECON 3FF3 - Research Methods in Economics
  • ECON 3G03 - Introduction to Advanced Economic Theory
  • ECON 3H03 - International Monetary Economics
  • ECON 3HH3 - International Trade
  • ECON 3K03 - Monetary Economics
  • ECON 3LL3 - History of Economic Theory
  • ECON 3M03 - Introduction to Game Theory
  • ECON 3Q03 - The Economics of Aging
  • ECON 3R03 - The History of Economic Growth
  • ECON 3S03 - Industrial Organization
  • ECON 3T03 - Economic Development
  • ECON 3U03 - Econometrics I
  • ECON 3W03 - Natural Resources
  • ECON 3WW3 - Applied Econometrics
  • ECON 3Y03 - Selected Topics
  • ECON 3Z03 - Health Economics
  • ECON 4A03 - Honours Economic Analysis
  • ECON 4AA3 - Economic Specialist Seminar
  • ECON 4B03 - Selected Topics
  • ECON 4G03 - Econometrics II
  • ECON 4M06 A/B - Direct Research 1
  • ECON 4N03 - Directed Research II
  • ECON 4T03 - Advanced Economic Theory I
  • ECON 4TT3 - Advanced Economic Theory II
Undergraduate Calendar | Economics Programs Economics Course Descriptions McMaster Economics Society
For more information:
Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics Undergraduate Program
KTH 426
905-525-9140 ext. 22765
econug@mcmaster.ca
Length:
4 Years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of 5.0 (C) including an average of at least 5.0 (C) in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
N/A

Hons.B.A.Combined Honours in Economics and Another Subject

Economics can be combined with programs in the Faculty of Social Sciences and the Faculty of Humanities.

Economics provides many opportunities to students who wish to pursue a combined degree. Among the more popular second fields of study are political science, labour studies, and sociology but economics can be and has been combined with a wide variety of disciplines including French, Psychology, English, History, and Geography.

Our graduates have found employment as:

Lawyers, Managers (government/business), Policy Researchers, Economic Analysts, Economic Consultants, Economic Forecasters, Financial Planners, Statisticians, Banking / Financial Services, Budget Analysts

30 units

from

  • Level I program completed prior to admission to the program.

12 units

6 units

or

15 units

Levels II, III, IV Economics with no more than six units from the following courses:

36 units

  • courses specified for the other subject

6 units

3 units

from

3 units

from

9 units

  • Electives


*  If requirement completed in Level I or with Grade 12 U courses, these units will be taken as electives.

Completion of any Level I program with a Grade Point Average of at least 5.0 including an average of at least 5.0 in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3. Satisfaction of admission requirements for the Honours program in the other B.A. subject. For continuation in the program, see Minimum Requirements for Entering and Continuing in a Program Beyond Level I.

Undergraduate Scholarships, Bursaries and Awards

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

Economics students are eligible for more than fifteen Scholarships and Awards.

Academic Counseling

Department counselors are available to help answer students’ questions about course selection and degree requirements. Most questions can be handled by email. Please contact the Chair of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Marc-André Letendre, with your inquiries at econugchair@mcmaster.ca. To meet with a counselor please refer to the schedule below.

January to April 2017

DAY

PROFESSOR

TIME

OFFICE

MONDAY

O’SHAUGHNESSY

11:00 - 12:00 KTH/403

TUESDAY

JEFFERSON 2:00 – 3:00 KTH/403

WEDNESDAY

HOLMES 1:30 – 2:30 KTH/442

THURSDAY

LETENDRE

1:00 – 2:00

KTH/410

 

Economics Clinics

Students having academic difficulties are encouraged to seek the help not only of their instructors and teaching assistants but also from clinics run by the Department of Economics and from the Student Success Centre. The Department of Economics provides an economics clinic that is run by graduate students who can help undergrad students having difficulties with first and second year courses.

The Economics Clinic will run from Monday, January 9 to Thursday, April 6 in the Winter term.

MONDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

TUESDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

WEDNESDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

THURSDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

 

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

  • ECON 1B03 - Introductory Microeconomics
  • ECON 1BB3 - Introductory Macroeconomics
  • ECON 2A03 - Economics of Labour-Market Issues
  • ECON 2B03 - Analysis of Economic Data
  • ECON 2CC3 - Health Economics and its Application to Health Policy
  • ECON 2D03 - Economic Issues
  • ECON 2F03 - The Political Economy of Development
  • ECON 2G03 - Intermediate Microeconomics I
  • ECON 2GG3 - Intermediate Microeconomics II
  • ECON 2H03 - Intermediate Macroeconomics I
  • ECON 2HH3 - Intermediate Macroeconomics II
  • ECON 2I03 - Financial Economics
  • ECON 2J03 - Environmental Economics
  • ECON 2K03 - Economic History of Canada
  • ECON 2N03 - Public Policy Toward Business
  • ECON 2P03 - Economics of Professional Sports
  • ECON 2Q03 - Economics of Bad Behaviour
  • ECON 2T03 - Economics of Trade Unionism and Labour
  • ECON 2X03 - Applied Business Economics
  • ECON 3B03 - Public Sector Economics: Expenditures
  • ECON 3C03 - Public Sector Economics: Taxation
  • ECON 3D03 - Labour Economics
  • ECON 3F03 - Methods of Inquiry in Economics
  • ECON 3FF3 - Research Methods in Economics
  • ECON 3G03 - Introduction to Advanced Economic Theory
  • ECON 3H03 - International Monetary Economics
  • ECON 3HH3 - International Trade
  • ECON 3K03 - Monetary Economics
  • ECON 3LL3 - History of Economic Theory
  • ECON 3M03 - Introduction to Game Theory
  • ECON 3Q03 - The Economics of Aging
  • ECON 3R03 - The History of Economic Growth
  • ECON 3S03 - Industrial Organization
  • ECON 3T03 - Economic Development
  • ECON 3U03 - Econometrics I
  • ECON 3W03 - Natural Resources
  • ECON 3WW3 - Applied Econometrics
  • ECON 3Y03 - Selected Topics
  • ECON 3Z03 - Health Economics
  • ECON 4A03 - Honours Economic Analysis
  • ECON 4AA3 - Economic Specialist Seminar
  • ECON 4B03 - Selected Topics
  • ECON 4G03 - Econometrics II
  • ECON 4M06 A/B - Direct Research 1
  • ECON 4N03 - Directed Research II
  • ECON 4T03 - Advanced Economic Theory I
  • ECON 4TT3 - Advanced Economic Theory II
Undergraduate Calendar | Economics Programs Economics Course Descriptions McMaster Economics Society
For more information:
Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Undergraduate Program
KTH 426
905-525-9140 ext. 22765
econug@mcmaster.ca
Length:
4 Years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of 5.0 (C) including an average of at least 5.0 (C) in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3. Satisfaction of admission requirements for the Honours program in the other B.A. subject.
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
N/A

Hons.B.A.Honours Economics and Computer Science

This program provides the students with a solid foundation in computer science and exposure to the field of economics thereby opening up major opportunities for economist with a programming background.

The undergraduate computer science curriculum at McMaster University places emphasis on the foundations of computer science and the integration of theory and applications while managing a sufficient breadth across the discipline. 

30 units

from

  • the Level I program completed prior to admission to the program.

12 units

6 units

18 units

Levels II, III, IV Economics with no more than six units from the following courses:

18 units

from

9 units

from

3 units

6 units

18 units

  • Electives

Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of 5.0 (C), including an average of 5.0 (C) in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3, and a weighted average of 5.0 (C) in ECON 1B03, 1BB3, COMP SCI 1MD3  and 1JC3; MATH 1A03, 1AA3 and 1B03. MATH 1B03 may be postponed until Level 2.

For continuation in the program, see Minimum Requirements for Entering and Continuing in a Program Beyond Level 1.

Undergraduate Scholarships, Bursaries and Awards

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

Economics students are eligible for more than fifteen Scholarships and Awards.

Academic Counseling

Department counselors are available to help answer students’ questions about course selection and degree requirements. Most questions can be handled by email. Please contact the Chair of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Marc-André Letendre, with your inquiries at econugchair@mcmaster.ca. To meet with a counselor please refer to the schedule below.

January to April 2017

DAY

PROFESSOR

TIME

OFFICE

MONDAY

O’SHAUGHNESSY

11:00 - 12:00 KTH/403

TUESDAY

JEFFERSON 2:00 – 3:00 KTH/403

WEDNESDAY

HOLMES 1:30 – 2:30 KTH/442

THURSDAY

LETENDRE

1:00 – 2:00

KTH/410

 

Economics Clinics

Students having academic difficulties are encouraged to seek the help not only of their instructors and teaching assistants but also from clinics run by the Department of Economics and from the Student Success Centre. The Department of Economics provides an economics clinic that is run by graduate students who can help undergrad students having difficulties with first and second year courses.

The Economics Clinic will run from Monday, January 9 to Thursday, April 6 in the Winter term.

MONDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

TUESDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

WEDNESDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

THURSDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

 

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

  • ECON 1B03 - Introductory Microeconomics
  • ECON 1BB3 - Introductory Macroeconomics
  • ECON 2A03 - Economics of Labour-Market Issues
  • ECON 2B03 - Analysis of Economic Data
  • ECON 2CC3 - Health Economics and its Application to Health Policy
  • ECON 2D03 - Economic Issues
  • ECON 2F03 - The Political Economy of Development
  • ECON 2G03 - Intermediate Microeconomics I
  • ECON 2GG3 - Intermediate Microeconomics II
  • ECON 2H03 - Intermediate Macroeconomics I
  • ECON 2HH3 - Intermediate Macroeconomics II
  • ECON 2I03 - Financial Economics
  • ECON 2J03 - Environmental Economics
  • ECON 2K03 - Economic History of Canada
  • ECON 2N03 - Public Policy Toward Business
  • ECON 2P03 - Economics of Professional Sports
  • ECON 2Q03 - Economics of Bad Behaviour
  • ECON 2T03 - Economics of Trade Unionism and Labour
  • ECON 2X03 - Applied Business Economics
  • ECON 3B03 - Public Sector Economics: Expenditures
  • ECON 3C03 - Public Sector Economics: Taxation
  • ECON 3D03 - Labour Economics
  • ECON 3F03 - Methods of Inquiry in Economics
  • ECON 3FF3 - Research Methods in Economics
  • ECON 3G03 - Introduction to Advanced Economic Theory
  • ECON 3H03 - International Monetary Economics
  • ECON 3HH3 - International Trade
  • ECON 3K03 - Monetary Economics
  • ECON 3LL3 - History of Economic Theory
  • ECON 3M03 - Introduction to Game Theory
  • ECON 3Q03 - The Economics of Aging
  • ECON 3R03 - The History of Economic Growth
  • ECON 3S03 - Industrial Organization
  • ECON 3T03 - Economic Development
  • ECON 3U03 - Econometrics I
  • ECON 3W03 - Natural Resources
  • ECON 3WW3 - Applied Econometrics
  • ECON 3Y03 - Selected Topics
  • ECON 3Z03 - Health Economics
  • ECON 4A03 - Honours Economic Analysis
  • ECON 4AA3 - Economic Specialist Seminar
  • ECON 4B03 - Selected Topics
  • ECON 4G03 - Econometrics II
  • ECON 4M06 A/B - Direct Research 1
  • ECON 4N03 - Directed Research II
  • ECON 4T03 - Advanced Economic Theory I
  • ECON 4TT3 - Advanced Economic Theory II
Undergraduate Calendar 2016/2017 Course Listings McMaster Economics Society Internships & Experiential Education McMaster / Mohawk Affiliated Certificates Apply Now
For more information:
Department of Economics, Undergraduate Program Office
KTH-426
905-525-9140 ext. 22765
econug@mcmaster.ca
Length:
4 years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of 5.0 (C), including an average of 5.0 (C) in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3, and a weighted average of 5.0 (C) in ECON 1B03, 1BB3, COMP SCI 1MD3 and 1JC3; MATH 1A03, 1AA3 and 1B03. MATH 1B03 may be postponed until Level 2
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
N/A

Hons.B.A.Honours Economics and Mathematics

For the motivated student, the honours economics and mathematics program gives the benefits of two cultures and two distinct modes of thought: an important aspect in developing critical thinking and in today's job market.

For the students who seek to pursue economics at a graduate level, this program provides students with an excellent grasp of the mathematic tools needed for advanced study.

30 units

from

  • the Level I program completed prior to admission to the program.

12 units

6 units

12 units

from Levels II, III, IV Economics with no more than six units from the following courses:

18 units

12 units

from

  • Levels II, III, IV Mathematics, Statistics with no more than six units at Level II, and at least three units at Level IV (See Notes 4 and 5 above.)

12 units

  • six units from ECON 2B03, ECON 3U03 
  • six units from Levels III, IV Mathematics or Statistics

or

9-18 units

  • Electives

Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of 5.0 (C) including  MATH  1A03 (or 1X03) an average of 5.0 (C) in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3 and a grade of 7 (B-) in each of MATH 1AA3 (or 1XX3) and 1B03.

For continuation in the program, see Minimum Requirements for Entering and Continuing in a Program Beyond Level 1.

Undergraduate Scholarships, Bursaries and Awards

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

Economics students are eligible for more than fifteen Scholarships and Awards.

Academic Counseling

Department counselors are available to help answer students’ questions about course selection and degree requirements. Most questions can be handled by email. Please contact the Chair of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Marc-André Letendre, with your inquiries at econugchair@mcmaster.ca. To meet with a counselor please refer to the schedule below.

January to April 2017

DAY

PROFESSOR

TIME

OFFICE

MONDAY

O’SHAUGHNESSY

11:00 - 12:00 KTH/403

TUESDAY

JEFFERSON 2:00 – 3:00 KTH/403

WEDNESDAY

HOLMES 1:30 – 2:30 KTH/442

THURSDAY

LETENDRE

1:00 – 2:00

KTH/410

 

Economics Clinics

Students having academic difficulties are encouraged to seek the help not only of their instructors and teaching assistants but also from clinics run by the Department of Economics and from the Student Success Centre. The Department of Economics provides an economics clinic that is run by graduate students who can help undergrad students having difficulties with first and second year courses.

The Economics Clinic will run from Monday, January 9 to Thursday, April 6 in the Winter term.

MONDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

TUESDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

WEDNESDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

THURSDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

  • ECON 1B03 - Introductory Microeconomics
  • ECON 1BB3 - Introductory Macroeconomics
  • ECON 2A03 - Economics of Labour-Market Issues
  • ECON 2B03 - Analysis of Economic Data
  • ECON 2CC3 - Health Economics and its Application to Health Policy
  • ECON 2D03 - Economic Issues
  • ECON 2F03 - The Political Economy of Development
  • ECON 2G03 - Intermediate Microeconomics I
  • ECON 2GG3 - Intermediate Microeconomics II
  • ECON 2H03 - Intermediate Macroeconomics I
  • ECON 2HH3 - Intermediate Macroeconomics II
  • ECON 2I03 - Financial Economics
  • ECON 2J03 - Environmental Economics
  • ECON 2K03 - Economic History of Canada
  • ECON 2N03 - Public Policy Toward Business
  • ECON 2P03 - Economics of Professional Sports
  • ECON 2Q03 - Economics of Bad Behaviour
  • ECON 2T03 - Economics of Trade Unionism and Labour
  • ECON 2X03 - Applied Business Economics
  • ECON 3B03 - Public Sector Economics: Expenditures
  • ECON 3C03 - Public Sector Economics: Taxation
  • ECON 3D03 - Labour Economics
  • ECON 3F03 - Methods of Inquiry in Economics
  • ECON 3FF3 - Research Methods in Economics
  • ECON 3G03 - Introduction to Advanced Economic Theory
  • ECON 3H03 - International Monetary Economics
  • ECON 3HH3 - International Trade
  • ECON 3K03 - Monetary Economics
  • ECON 3LL3 - History of Economic Theory
  • ECON 3M03 - Introduction to Game Theory
  • ECON 3Q03 - The Economics of Aging
  • ECON 3R03 - The History of Economic Growth
  • ECON 3S03 - Industrial Organization
  • ECON 3T03 - Economic Development
  • ECON 3U03 - Econometrics I
  • ECON 3W03 - Natural Resources
  • ECON 3WW3 - Applied Econometrics
  • ECON 3Y03 - Selected Topics
  • ECON 3Z03 - Health Economics
  • ECON 4A03 - Honours Economic Analysis
  • ECON 4AA3 - Economic Specialist Seminar
  • ECON 4B03 - Selected Topics
  • ECON 4G03 - Econometrics II
  • ECON 4M06 A/B - Direct Research 1
  • ECON 4N03 - Directed Research II
  • ECON 4T03 - Advanced Economic Theory I
  • ECON 4TT3 - Advanced Economic Theory II
Undergraduate Calendar 2016/2017 Course Listings McMaster Economics Society Internships & Experiential Education McMaster / Mohawk Affiliated Certificates Apply Now
For more information:
Department of Economics, Undergraduate Program Office
KTH-426
905-525-9140 ext. 22765
econug@mcmaster.ca
Length:
4 years
Required Credential:
Completion of any Level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of 5.0 (C) including MATH 1A03 (or 1X03) an average of 5.0 (C) in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3 and a grade of 7 (B-) in each of MATH 1AA3 (or 1XX3) and 1B03
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
N/A

B.A.Bachelor of Arts in Economics

The BA in Economics program is a 3-year program designed to provide a general education, with an emphasis on the skills and knowledge required to understand the economy. Although it is not intended to prepare students for specific careers, the degree continues to be attractive to a wide range of employers.

The program helps to prepare students for their future careers by:

  1. acquainting them with current thinking on matters of public importance, such as inflation, unemployment, the national debt, taxation policy, labour force analysis, social policy reform, international trade policy, natural resource and environmental economics;
  2. training students to think logically and clearly about matters involving choice among alternatives (an important transferable skill); and
  3. preparing students for further study.   Post-graduate work in such graduate fields as business, law, and public administration is possible with a B.A. degree but an Honours degree is increasingly presumed.   A  B.A. degree can also be very effectively combined with many one-year post-degree co-op programmes (such as journalism, human resource management, and logistics, to name just three) at community colleges.
  4. In September 2012, McMaster University and Mohawk College began offering a Mohawk Business Studies Certificate for Social Sciences students. See below for more information about this program.

Our graduates have found employment as:

Lawyers, Managers (government/business), Policy Researchers, Economic Analysts, Economic Consultants, Economic Forecasters, Financial Planners, Statisticians, Banking / Financial Services, Budget Analysts

Students may broaden employment possibilities by including several non-economics courses in their program as electives. For example, a computer science course or an expository writing course may be appealing to some students.

90 units total (Levels I to III), of which 42 units may be Level I

30 units

from

  • the Level I program completed prior to admission to the program.

9 units

15 units

Levels II, III, IV Economics with no more than six units from the following courses:

3 units

from

3 units

from

30 units

  • Electives. The number of units of Economics courses above Level I (excluding ECON 2B03 and 3U03) must not exceed 36.

*If requirement was completed in Level I or with Grade 12 U courses, these units will be taken as electives.

Completion of any level 1 program with a Completion of any level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of 5.0 (C) including an average of at least  5.0 (C) in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3

If a student misses the cut-off for enrolling in the level II BA program, he or she can transfer to the BA program for level III if the student meets one of the two following qualifications: an average of 4.0 or higher in Economics 1B03 and 1BB3 OR an average of 4.0 in Economics 2G03 and 2H03. When these conditions are met, formal approval will be granted by a departmental counsellor.

To remain in programs beyond level II, and to graduate from them, students must maintain a GPA of at least 3.5 for the BA.

Undergraduate Scholarships, Bursaries and Awards

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

Economics students are eligible for more than fifteen Scholarships and Awards.

Academic Counseling

Department counselors are available to help answer students’ questions about course selection and degree requirements. Most questions can be handled by email. Please contact the Chair of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Marc-André Letendre, with your inquiries at econugchair@mcmaster.ca. To meet with a counselor please refer to the schedule below.

January to April 2017

DAY

PROFESSOR

TIME

OFFICE

MONDAY

O’SHAUGHNESSY

11:00 - 12:00 KTH/403

TUESDAY

JEFFERSON 2:00 – 3:00 KTH/403

WEDNESDAY

HOLMES 1:30 – 2:30 KTH/442

THURSDAY

LETENDRE

1:00 – 2:00

KTH/410

 

Economics Clinics

Students having academic difficulties are encouraged to seek the help not only of their instructors and teaching assistants but also from clinics run by the Department of Economics and from the Student Success Centre. The Department of Economics provides an economics clinic that is run by graduate students who can help undergrad students having difficulties with first and second year courses.

The Economics Clinic will run from Monday, January 9 to Thursday, April 6 in the Winter term.

MONDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

TUESDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

WEDNESDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

THURSDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

 

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

  • ECON 1B03 - Introductory Microeconomics
  • ECON 1BB3 - Introductory Macroeconomics
  • ECON 2A03 - Economics of Labour-Market Issues
  • ECON 2B03 - Analysis of Economic Data
  • ECON 2CC3 - Health Economics and its Application to Health Policy
  • ECON 2D03 - Economic Issues
  • ECON 2F03 - The Political Economy of Development
  • ECON 2G03 - Intermediate Microeconomics I
  • ECON 2GG3 - Intermediate Microeconomics II
  • ECON 2H03 - Intermediate Macroeconomics I
  • ECON 2HH3 - Intermediate Macroeconomics II
  • ECON 2I03 - Financial Economics
  • ECON 2J03 - Environmental Economics
  • ECON 2K03 - Economic History of Canada
  • ECON 2N03 - Public Policy Toward Business
  • ECON 2P03 - Economics of Professional Sports
  • ECON 2Q03 - Economics of Bad Behaviour
  • ECON 2T03 - Economics of Trade Unionism and Labour
  • ECON 2X03 - Applied Business Economics
  • ECON 3B03 - Public Sector Economics: Expenditures
  • ECON 3C03 - Public Sector Economics: Taxation
  • ECON 3D03 - Labour Economics
  • ECON 3F03 - Methods of Inquiry in Economics
  • ECON 3FF3 - Research Methods in Economics
  • ECON 3G03 - Introduction to Advanced Economic Theory
  • ECON 3H03 - International Monetary Economics
  • ECON 3HH3 - International Trade
  • ECON 3K03 - Monetary Economics
  • ECON 3LL3 - History of Economic Theory
  • ECON 3M03 - Introduction to Game Theory
  • ECON 3Q03 - The Economics of Aging
  • ECON 3R03 - The History of Economic Growth
  • ECON 3S03 - Industrial Organization
  • ECON 3T03 - Economic Development
  • ECON 3U03 - Econometrics I
  • ECON 3W03 - Natural Resources
  • ECON 3WW3 - Applied Econometrics
  • ECON 3Y03 - Selected Topics
  • ECON 3Z03 - Health Economics
  • ECON 4A03 - Honours Economic Analysis
  • ECON 4AA3 - Economic Specialist Seminar
  • ECON 4B03 - Selected Topics
  • ECON 4G03 - Econometrics II
  • ECON 4M06 A/B - Direct Research 1
  • ECON 4N03 - Directed Research II
  • ECON 4T03 - Advanced Economic Theory I
  • ECON 4TT3 - Advanced Economic Theory II
Undergraduate Calendar | Economics Programs Economics Course Descriptions McMaster Economics Society Experiential Education McMaster/Mohawk Affiliated Certificates Apply Now
For more information:
Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Undergraduate Program
KTH 426
905-525-9140 ext. 22765
econug@mcmaster.ca
Length:
3 Years
Required Credential:
Completion of any level 1 program with a Grade Point Average of 3.5 (C-) including an average of 4.0 (C-) in ECON 1B03 and 1BB3
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
N/A

MinorMinor in Economics

Students enrolled in a four- or five-level program in another subject may pursue a minor in economics.

During the final year of their program, students complete an online Graduation Information Form. Students "declare" a minor by indicating the courses used to complete the minor on this form.

Undergraduate Scholarships, Bursaries and Awards

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

Academic Counseling

Department counselors are available to help answer students’ questions about course selection and degree requirements. Most questions can be handled by email. Please contact the Chair of Undergraduate Studies, Professor Marc-André Letendre, with your inquiries at econugchair@mcmaster.ca. To meet with a counselor please refer to the schedule below.

December 2016

DAY

PROFESSOR

TIME

OFFICE

THURSDAY

LETENDRE

10:30 – 11:30

KTH/410

Economics Clinics

Students having academic difficulties are encouraged to seek the help not only of their instructors and teaching assistants but also from clinics run by the Department of Economics and from the Student Success Centre. The Department of Economics provides an economics clinic that is run by graduate students who can help undergrad students having difficulties with first and second year courses.

The Economics Clinic will run from Wednesday, Sept 14th to Thursday, Dec 8th in the Fall term.

MONDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

TUESDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

WEDNESDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

THURSDAY

10:00AM- 1:00PM

KTH-306A

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

  • ECON 1B03 - Introductory Microeconomics
  • ECON 1BB3 - Introductory Macroeconomics
  • ECON 2A03 - Economics of Labour-Market Issues
  • ECON 2B03 - Analysis of Economic Data
  • ECON 2CC3 - Health Economics and its Application to Health Policy
  • ECON 2D03 - Economic Issues
  • ECON 2F03 - The Political Economy of Development
  • ECON 2G03 - Intermediate Microeconomics I
  • ECON 2GG3 - Intermediate Microeconomics II
  • ECON 2H03 - Intermediate Macroeconomics I
  • ECON 2HH3 - Intermediate Macroeconomics II
  • ECON 2I03 - Financial Economics
  • ECON 2J03 - Environmental Economics
  • ECON 2K03 - Economic History of Canada
  • ECON 2N03 - Public Policy Toward Business
  • ECON 2P03 - Economics of Professional Sports
  • ECON 2Q03 - Economics of Bad Behaviour
  • ECON 2T03 - Economics of Trade Unionism and Labour
  • ECON 2X03 - Applied Business Economics
  • ECON 3B03 - Public Sector Economics: Expenditures
  • ECON 3C03 - Public Sector Economics: Taxation
  • ECON 3D03 - Labour Economics
  • ECON 3F03 - Methods of Inquiry in Economics
  • ECON 3FF3 - Research Methods in Economics
  • ECON 3G03 - Introduction to Advanced Economic Theory
  • ECON 3H03 - International Monetary Economics
  • ECON 3HH3 - International Trade
  • ECON 3K03 - Monetary Economics
  • ECON 3LL3 - History of Economic Theory
  • ECON 3M03 - Introduction to Game Theory
  • ECON 3Q03 - The Economics of Aging
  • ECON 3R03 - The History of Economic Growth
  • ECON 3S03 - Industrial Organization
  • ECON 3T03 - Economic Development
  • ECON 3U03 - Econometrics I
  • ECON 3W03 - Natural Resources
  • ECON 3WW3 - Applied Econometrics
  • ECON 3Y03 - Selected Topics
  • ECON 3Z03 - Health Economics
  • ECON 4A03 - Honours Economic Analysis
  • ECON 4AA3 - Economic Specialist Seminar
  • ECON 4B03 - Selected Topics
  • ECON 4G03 - Econometrics II
  • ECON 4M06 A/B - Direct Research 1
  • ECON 4N03 - Directed Research II
  • ECON 4T03 - Advanced Economic Theory I
  • ECON 4TT3 - Advanced Economic Theory II
Undergraduate Calendar | Economics Programs Economics Course Descriptions McMaster Economics Society
For more information:
Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Undergraduate Program
KTH 426
905-525-9140 ext. 22765
econug@mcmaster.ca
Length:
N/A
Required Credential:
High School Diploma or Equivalent
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
N/A

M.A.Master of Arts in Economics

The Masters of Arts in Economics (MA) is a one-year program that provides a thorough grounding in modern economics, blending both theoretical and empirical methods. Graduates of the program normally pursue one of two career tracks. One track is immediate placement in a position as an economic analyst. Graduates regularly take up positions in a variety of public- and private-sector organizations. A second track is advanced study of economics, usually at the PhD level. Indeed, a fundamental goal of the program is to prepare students for such advanced study of economics. For this reason, the program emphasizes rigorous training in microeconomic theory, macroeconomic theory, and econometrics, while enabling students to take elective courses in their areas of interest, including fields such as labour economics, health economics, public economics, industrial organization, population economics, monetary economics, international economics, and international finance.

The following courses are compulsory for MA in Economics students: 

  • a one-term course in microeconomic theory
  • a one-term course in macroeconomic theory
  • two one-term courses in econometrics (one each semester)
  • a short course in mathematical methods

In addition to these compulsory courses, students take four electives.  Many of these elective courses provide students with an opportunity to undertake a substantial economic project of their own, most commonly but not exclusively, an original empirical economic analysis.  Such work is supported by research facilities affiliated with the department, such as the Public Economics Data Analysis Laboratory (PEDAL), the Statistics Canada Research Data Centre (RDC), and the McMaster Experimental Economics Laboratory (McEEL).  Students in the M.A. in Economics program who have successfully completed ECON 761 may apply for the Co-op option associated with this degree program.

In order for your online application to be considered complete, please ensure the following items have been uploaded prior to submission:

  • Letters of reference
  • Scanned Copies of Official Transcripts - **Official transcripts are required only when offer has been made and accepted
  • Statement of Interest
  • C.V. (Curriculum Vitae)
  • Application Fee
  • **English proficiency requirements (if applicable)  Originals must be sent directly to the Department of Economics

A student whose native language is not English, and who has not completed an English-language degree in a predominantly English-speaking country, must submit a TOEFL or IELTS score. The minimum acceptable TOEFL score for the Dept of Economics is 580 (237 on the computerized exam; 92 iBT); the minimum acceptable IELTS score is 7+.  Please note, the minimum requirement for the Dept of Economics is higher than the School of Graduate Studies minimum of 6.5. 

Two Letters of Reference

A complete application includes two confidential letters of recommendation from instructors most familiar with your academic work. McMaster University uses the Electronic Referencing System. You must enter the email addresses of your referees as part of the on-line application form. The system will automatically send an e-Reference request on your behalf to the referees.

Academic Transcripts

Applicants must provide one official transcript of academic work completed to date once offer has been accepted sent directly from the issuing institution.  

Statement of Interest

All applicants must provide a one-page statement (12pt font, single-space, 1-inch margins) explaining why you would like to pursue the M.A. in Economics at McMaster University.

For more information on this program please visit our FAQ's Section for the MA in Economics.

Tuition

Information on Graduate Program fees can be found on the Student Accounts and Cashier's website. To visit this page, click here.

Financial Aid

Internal

Students to whom we offer admission are automatically considered for financial assistance – no special forms need be filled out. Funding is awarded on academic excellence and the availability of funds. Funding is open to all domestic and international students.

External

Information on external scholarship support can be found at the following sites:

700 Topics in Economics

For Fall 2016 - MAEP Course on Selected Topics in Labour Market Performance and Policy - Instructor Jim Stanford.

This course will consider a range of current topics related to work and employment, labour market functioning, and labour market policy interventions.  Potential topics will include: employment strategies of firms; sectoral and regional trends in job-creation; “precarious” work and its consequences; demographic change and the ageing of the workforce; trends in labour force participation; unemployment and underemployment; trade unions and collective representation; new models of employee “voice;” trends in wage determination; inequality and low-wage work; wage and employment regulation.  Each topic will be introduced and considered in light of economic theory and published applied research, with policy implications explored in the context of Canadian labour market experience.

703 Experimental Economics 

An introduction to the design of laboratory environments in economics, to the conduct of laboratory sessions, and to the analysis of laboratory generated data. Applications to public economics, industrial organization, and the evaluation of economic theory are studied.

710 Population Economics I

A survey of topics in population economics, including the economic consequences of population aging, the economic theory of fertility, and the interrelations between economic and demographic phenomena generally.

711 Population Economics II

An advanced course in population economics, open only to Ph.D. students choosing population economics as a field.

Prerequisite: *710

716 History of Economic Thought

The development of economic analysis from its beginning through mercantilism through the classical school of political economy, Marx, marginalism, institutional economics, and Keynes to modern macroeconomics and microeconomics.

721 Microeconomic Theory I

This course covers basic graduate-level microeconomic theory. It includes choice under uncertainty, general equilibrium, competitive market with adverse selection, and contract theory. Students are expected to be familiar with linear algebra, optimization technique, and basic real analysis.

722 Microeconomic Theory II

Topics include the theory of public goods and externalities, non-cooperative game theory and the economics of information such as adverse selection, moral hazard, and mechanism design. Applications can include bargaining, monopoly and oligopoly pricing, insurance and employment contracts, and auctions.

723 Macroeconomic Theory I

This course is an introduction to advanced macroeconomic theory which is based on dynamic optimization and general equilibrium. Applications will vary from year to year and may include economic fluctuations, economic growth, asset pricing, and fiscal policy.

724 Macroeconomic Theory II

The course focuses on theories that help explain business cycle fluctuations and economic growth. Some additional topics will also be covered that change from year to year.

727 Microeconomic Theory for Public Policy

This course covers graduate-level microeconomic theory, but with an emphasis on how the tools of microeconomics can be used to inform public policy. Topics include theory of the household and the firm, decisions under uncertainty and over time, and an introduction to welfare economics.

728 Macroeconomic Theory for Public Policy

This course takes a public economics approach to macroeconomics, stressing both efficiency and equity dimensions of each policy issue. The three modules focus on short-run stabilization problems, structural unemployment and income inequality, and long-run growth in living standards. Usually all three modules are included, but in some years more in depth treatment is given to just two modules.

731 Public Finance

Topics may include positive and normative theories of taxation, the provision of public goods, collective decision-making, the theory of local public goods, and issues in fiscal federalism including tax and expenditure competition and inter-governmental transfers.

Prerequisite:  *733

733 Topics in Public Economics

Topics may include: capital taxation; economic theory of redistribution; empirical assessment of the effects of taxation and government expenditure; and the measurement of welfare, poverty and inequality.

735 Economics of Public Sector Policies

This course will study a current topic or theme in Public Economics. State of the art research will be surveyed with an emphasis on the policy relevance of research. Possible themes include: politicians v. bureaucrats in the provision of public goods, the effects of government policy on the provision of education, the alleviation of racial segregation through government policy, the relationship between federal and local governments.

736 Environmental and Resource Economics 

The course covers selected issues in the management of natural resources and the environment. Possible topics include the theory of externalities and policy instruments for remedying the associated market failure, management of renewable and non-renewable common property resources, contingent valuation, ecological indicators and the measurement of natural resource and environmental variables in the national accounts.

741 Monetary Economics

This course is devoted to the discussion of some key issues in monetary theory and policy. It does not assume prior knowledge of dynamic optimization techniques. Topics that use modern macroeconomic methods will be discussed at the end of the semester.

742 Topics in Money and Macroeconomics

The course covers stochastic dynamic general equilibrium models in different fields of macroeconomics. Topics may include business cycle theory, numerical methods, open-economy models (real and monetary), heterogenous-agent models, asset pricing and growth theory.

Prerequisite: *724

751 International Trade, Development and Investment

The neoclassical or real theory of international trade is presented in a general equilibrium format using geometrical and mathematical methods. A central application of these methods is to the trade problems of developing countries. Topics therefore may include North-South trade, export-led growth, commercial policy, elective protection, foreign investment, integration, savings, financial development and income distribution.

752 International Finance

This course examines international real and monetary business cycle models to explain economic fluctuations of main macroeconomic variables within and across countries. The course also covers empirical evidence and theories of sovereign debt and default.

753 Topics in International Economics

This course builds on the material in ECON 751 . The course covers advanced topics in international trade, such as the welfare gains from trade, productivity and international trade, and border effects.

761 Econometrics I

Topics include linear regression and generalized least squares.

762 Econometrics II

Topics include time series and robust variance estimation.

765 Mathematical Methods

This course provides a systematic review of mathematical and statistical methods commonly used in economic modeling.

766 Quantitative Methods 

Topics include methods of seasonal adjustment, alternative forecasting techniques, price indexes, demographic modeling and projection, interpreting econometric models, and input-output analysis.

768 Advanced Econometrics

This course builds on the material in ECON 761 and ECON 762. Topics may include: nonparametric estimation, robust estimation, asymptotictheory, econometric programming.

769 Applied Microeconometrics

The main topic of the course is the application of econometric techniques to the study of household behaviour. Topics may include expenditure systems, the relationship of consumption patterns, labour supply, and savings behaviour, aggregation, price indices and household production. There are extensive illustrations employing household microdata.

770 Advanced Analysis of Survey Data

The course is divided into two parts. The objective of Part I is to have students identify a suitable data set (research study) and develop a proposal describing their secondary analysis project. Students will be helped to develop their 1-2 page proposals which will include: the research question, a brief outline of its relevance and importance; identification of the appropriate data set(s); a brief statement about analytical approach to be used; and the identification of 3-4 key references. The instructors have access to several data sets that can be used for this course. This part will occur between October and December. There will be two class sessions-one in October and the other in November and the opportunity for two individual sessions. The objective of Part 2 is to complete the research paper (review of the literature, analysis of data, write-up and revision of the report) with the purpose of submitting the paper for review to a peer-reviewed journal. This part will occur between January-May and include 10 class sessions.

773 Economic Policy Analysis I

This course is the first semester of the two-semester sequence that will provide a grounding in policy processes, policy issues, and important institutional structures, in relevant policy sectors in Canada, and provide an introduction to the basic research designs appropriate for establishing causal relationships through program/policy evaluation.

774 Economic Policy Analysis II

This course is the second semester in the two-semester sequence in Economic Policy Analysis. It will survey more advanced issues in policy evaluation and culminate in a major policy project.

781 Labour Economics I

A survey of basic labour economics. Topics include labour demand, labour supply, and the determination of equilibrium wages in competitive markets. Sources of wage differentials in competitive markets, such as human capital investment and compensating differentials, are examined, as are the effects on labour markets of government policies such as minimum wages, immigration restrictions, occupational health and safety regulations, and subsidies to education.

782 Labour Economics II

This course surveys state-of-the-art research in labour economics. Recently covered topics include asymmetric information models of strikes; estimation of duration models; recent trends in wage structure, firm size, unionization, and self employment; the impact of international competition and technological change on labour markets; and modeling dynamic family labour supply decisions.

Prerequisite: *781

784 Industrial Organization

This course examines the strategic interactions of firms in markets, and their implications for firms’ profits and consumer welfare. The course provides analytical concepts for analyzing firm behavior in different market structures. The course has two main goals: (i) introduce micro-economic and game-theoretic tools to understand competition and market power; (ii) develop an active understanding of econometric analysis of market power and competition. Both goals are illustrated with applications to competition policy and competitive strategy. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to develop and actively understand econometric analysis of market power and competition.

785 Economics of Human Resource Policies

This course will study a current topic or theme in Human Resource Economics. State-of-the-art research will be surveyed, with an emphasis on the policy relevance of research. Possible themes include: the design of social insurance systems for unemployment, disability, or retirement; policies to foster human capital formation; methods for evaluating labour market interventions; the human resource policy implications of globalization, technological change, or aging populations.

788 Health Economics

This is a basic graduate survey course on the economics of health and health care. Topics include the organization, financing and utilization of health care services. Both theory and evidence relating to patterns of consumer and provider behaviour are examined, as are the functioning and regulation of “markets” for health services. Major public policy issues in the provision of health care in Canada are identified and the economic aspects of such issues are considered in detail.

791 Topics in Advanced Health Economics

This course focuses on issues relating to the economics of health and health care. It builds on ECON 788 and exposes students to more advanced topics and aspects of recent research in health economics. The specific topics presented depend on the instructors for each offering. Recent topics have included methods of economic evaluation and health technology assessment, the economics of work and health, the evaluation of health-care related interventions, advances in the empirical analysis of income and health inequalities, health human resources, and the evolution of health from childhood to adulthood.

Prerequisite: *788

793 Health Economic Policy

This course will study specific topics or theme areas of health economics. State-of-the-art research will be surveyed, with an emphasis on the policy relevance of research. Possible topics include the economics of health, health care financing, health care funding, the economics of the pharmaceutical sector, health and aging, and labour market experiences and health.

795 Analysis of Health Data

This course is designed to introduce students to methods for the analysis of health data, with a particular focus on the use of survey datasets used in health-related micro-econometric research. Investigating features of health data requires the recognition of and methodology to cope with several characteristics not regularly (and rarely simultaneously) encountered in other areas. During the course, we will focus on the use of cross-sectional and longitudinal observational data to estimate causal parameters of interest and test hypotheses relevant to the econometric analysis of health data. At the end of the course, students should be able to perform their own econometric analyses of health data, and interpret and evaluate related studies.

796 Economics Co-op Work Term I

Students registered in either a Master or PhD program in the Department of Economics may optionally work a total of eight months in either one or two co-op placements.  Students must be registered in this course for the first four months of a co-op placement. This course is not for credit.

797 Economics Co-op Work Term II

Students registered in either a Master or PhD program in the Department of Economics may optionally work a total of eight months in either one or two co-op placements. Students must be registered in this course for the second four months of a co-op placement. This course is not for credit.

798 Workshop in Economics I

799 Workshop in Economics II

Economics Graduate Handbook MA in Economics FAQs TA Handbook International Student Services Graduate Students Association Apply Now
For more information:
Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Graduate Program
KTH 426
905-525-9140 ext.24731
econgrd@mcmaster.ca
Length:
1 Year
Required Credential:
Honours B.A. in Economics
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
January 30

M.A.Masters in Economic Policy

The Masters of Economic Policy (MAEP) is a one-year program that provides a thorough grounding in modern economics, blending both theoretical and empirical methods.

The Masters of Arts in Economic Policy (MAEP) is a one-year program designed to train students in applied economic analysis with a strong policy orientation. Although some graduates do pursue PhD studies in economics, policy analysis, or related areas, the primary purpose of the MAEP program is to prepare students for employment as economic analysts in a variety of public and private-sector organizations. The MAEP program is distinguished from traditional public policy programs, which often lack rigorous economic analysis in the policy context. It is distinguished from traditional MA in Economics programs, which commonly provide more abstract technical training, with only limited opportunities to apply this training to “real world” policy problems. The MAEP aims to provide students with graduate-level technical training that has direct policy relevance.

To achieve this, the program offers specially designed courses in microeconomic and macroeconomic theory that emphasize the use of economic theory in the analysis of public policy. In addition, the program offers a two-course sequence in economic policy analysis, which requires that students conduct a substantial policy-oriented empirical analysis, culminating in a presentation to an audience that includes policy makers. In addition to these required courses (open only to students in the MAEP program), students also take three elective courses in their areas of interest, including labour economics, health economics, public economics, industrial organization, population economics, monetary economics, international economics and international finance (brief descriptions of courses available can be found here). Many of these elective courses provide students with an opportunity to undertake a substantial economic project of their own, most commonly but not exclusively, an original empirical economic analysis.  Such work is supported by research facilities affiliated with the department, such as the Public Economics Data Analysis Laboratory (PEDAL), the Statistics Canada Research Data Centre (RDC), and the McMaster Experimental Economics Laboratory (McEEL). Beyond courses offered by the department of economics, a student is allowed to take up to two one-term graduate courses offered by other departments, with the approval of the graduate chair (economics) and of the course instructor.  Students in recent years, for example, have taken finance courses offered by the DeGroote School of Business, health-related courses offered by the Faculty of Health Sciences, and statistics courses offered by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.  Students in the M.A. in Economic Policy program who have successfully completed ECON 761 may apply for the Co-op option associated with this degree program.

In a typical year there are 12-15 students enrolled in our MAEP program, leading to small class sizes and substantial interaction between students and faculty.

 

Program of Study 

Candidates for the Master of Arts in Economic Policy must complete eight one-term courses. The following five courses are mandatory:

  • a one-term course in microeconomic theory for public policy
  • a one-term course in macroeconomic theory for public policy
  • a one-term course in econometrics
  • two one-term courses in economic policy analysis

In addition to these compulsory courses, students take four electives.  Many of these elective courses provide students with an opportunity to undertake a substantial economic project of their own, most commonly but not exclusively, an original empirical economic analysis.  Such work is supported by research facilities affiliated with the department, such as the Public Economics Data Analysis Laboratory (PEDAL), the Statistics Canada Research Data Centre (RDC), and the McMaster Experimental Economics Laboratory (McEEL).  Students in the M.A. in Economics program who have successfully completed ECON 761 may apply for the Co-op option associated with this degree program.

 

Admissions & Applications:

In order for your online application to be considered complete, please ensure the following items have been uploaded prior to submission:

  • Letters of reference
  • Scanned Copies of Official Transcripts - **Official transcripts are required only when offer has been made and accepted
  • Policy Statement
  • Statement of Interest
  • C.V. (Curriculum Vitae)
  • Fee Payment
  • **English proficiency requirements (if applicable)  Originals sent directly to the Department of Economics

A student whose native language is not English, and who has not completed an English-language degree in a predominantly English-speaking country, must submit a TOEFL or IELTS score. The minimum acceptable TOEFL score for the Dept of Economics is 580 (237 on the computerized exam; 92 iBT); the minimum acceptable IELTS score is 7+.  Please note, the minimum requirement for the Dept of Economics is higher than the School of Graduate Studies minimum of 6.5.

Two Letters of Reference

A complete application includes two confidential letters of recommendation from instructors most familiar with your academic work. McMaster University uses the Electronic Referencing System. You must enter the email addresses of your referees as part of the on-line application form. The system will automatically send an e-Reference request on your behalf to the referees.

Academic Transcripts

Applicants must provide one official transcript of academic work completed to date once offer has been accepted sent directly from the issuing institution. 

Policy Statement

Applicants must submit a policy statement that is a maximum of 2 pages single-spaced (1” margins, 12pt font) and that includes the following three components:

  • A concise statement of the policy issue
  • A description of how economic analysis might contribute to addressing the policy issue
  • A statement of how you anticipate that the skills and knowledge gained through the Masters program will enable you to conduct an economic analysis of the policy issue

The statement should include your full name so that we can match it to the rest of your application.

Statement of Interest

All applicants must provide a one-page statement (12pt font, single-space, 1-inch margins) explaining why you would like to pursue the M.A. in Economics at McMaster University.

For more information on this program please visit our FAQ's section for the MA in Economic Policy.

Tuition

Information on Graduate Program fees can be found on the Student Accounts and Cashier's website. To visit this page, click here.

Financial Aid

Internal

Students to whom we offer admission are automatically considered for financial assistance – no special forms need be filled out. Funding is awarded on academic excellence and the availability of funds. Funding is open to all domestic and international students.

External

Information on external scholarship support can be found at the following sites:

700 Topics in Economics 

For Fall 2016 - MAEP Course on Selected Topics in Labour Market Performance and Policy - Instructor Jim Stanford.

This course will consider a range of current topics related to work and employment, labour market functioning, and labour market policy interventions.  Potential topics will include: employment strategies of firms; sectoral and regional trends in job-creation; “precarious” work and its consequences; demographic change and the ageing of the workforce; trends in labour force participation; unemployment and underemployment; trade unions and collective representation; new models of employee “voice;” trends in wage determination; inequality and low-wage work; wage and employment regulation.  Each topic will be introduced and considered in light of economic theory and published applied research, with policy implications explored in the context of Canadian labour market experience.

703 Experimental Economics

An introduction to the design of laboratory environments in economics, to the conduct of laboratory sessions, and to the analysis of laboratory generated data. Applications to public economics, industrial organization, and the evaluation of economic theory are studied.

710 Population Economics I

A survey of topics in population economics, including the economic consequences of population aging, the economic theory of fertility, and the interrelations between economic and demographic phenomena generally.

711 Population Economics II

An advanced course in population economics, open only to Ph.D. students choosing population economics as a field.

Prerequisite: *710

716 History of Economic Thought

The development of economic analysis from its beginning through mercantilism through the classical school of political economy, Marx, marginalism, institutional economics, and Keynes to modern macroeconomics and microeconomics.

721 Microeconomic Theory I

This course covers basic graduate-level microeconomic theory. It includes choice under uncertainty, general equilibrium, competitive market with adverse selection, and contract theory. Students are expected to be familiar with linear algebra, optimization technique, and basic real analysis.

722 Microeconomic Theory II

Topics include the theory of public goods and externalities, non-cooperative game theory and the economics of information such as adverse selection, moral hazard, and mechanism design. Applications can include bargaining, monopoly and oligopoly pricing, insurance and employment contracts, and auctions.

723 Macroeconomic Theory I

This course is an introduction to advanced macroeconomic theory which is based on dynamic optimization and general equilibrium. Applications will vary from year to year and may include economic fluctuations, economic growth, asset pricing, and fiscal policy.

724 Macroeconomic Theory II

The course focuses on theories that help explain business cycle fluctuations and economic growth. Some additional topics will also be covered that change from year to year.

727 Microeconomic Theory for Public Policy

This course covers graduate-level microeconomic theory, but with an emphasis on how the tools of microeconomics can be used to inform public policy. Topics include theory of the household and the firm, decisions under uncertainty and over time, and an introduction to welfare economics.

728 Macroeconomic Theory for Public Policy

This course takes a public economics approach to macroeconomics, stressing both efficiency and equity dimensions of each policy issue. The three modules focus on short-run stabilization problems, structural unemployment and income inequality, and long-run growth in living standards. Usually all three modules are included, but in some years more in depth treatment is given to just two modules.

731 Public Finance

Topics may include positive and normative theories of taxation, the provision of public goods, collective decision-making, the theory of local public goods, and issues in fiscal federalism including tax and expenditure competition and inter-governmental transfers.

Prerequisite:  *733

733 Topics in Public Economics

Topics may include: capital taxation; economic theory of redistribution; empirical assessment of the effects of taxation and government expenditure; and the measurement of welfare, poverty and inequality.

735 Economics of Public Sector Policies

This course will study a current topic or theme in Public Economics. State of the art research will be surveyed with an emphasis on the policy relevance of research. Possible themes include: politicians v. bureaucrats in the provision of public goods, the effects of government policy on the provision of education, the alleviation of racial segregation through government policy, the relationship between federal and local governments.

736 Environmental and Resource Economics 

The course covers selected issues in the management of natural resources and the environment. Possible topics include the theory of externalities and policy instruments for remedying the associated market failure, management of renewable and non-renewable common property resources, contingent valuation, ecological indicators and the measurement of natural resource and environmental variables in the national accounts.

741 Monetary Economics

This course is devoted to the discussion of some key issues in monetary theory and policy. It does not assume prior knowledge of dynamic optimization techniques. Topics that use modern macroeconomic methods will be discussed at the end of the semester.

742 Topics in Money and Macroeconomics

The course covers stochastic dynamic general equilibrium models in different fields of macroeconomics. Topics may include business cycle theory, numerical methods, open-economy models (real and monetary), heterogenous-agent models, asset pricing and growth theory.

Prerequisite: *724

751 International Trade, Development and Investment

The neoclassical or real theory of international trade is presented in a general equilibrium format using geometrical and mathematical methods. A central application of these methods is to the trade problems of developing countries. Topics therefore may include North-South trade, export-led growth, commercial policy, elective protection, foreign investment, integration, savings, financial development and income distribution.

752 International Finance

This course examines international real and monetary business cycle models to explain economic fluctuations of main macroeconomic variables within and across countries. The course also covers empirical evidence and theories of sovereign debt and default.

753 Topics in International Economics

This course builds on the material in ECON 751 . The course covers advanced topics in international trade, such as the welfare gains from trade, productivity and international trade, and border effects.

761 Econometrics I

Topics include linear regression and generalized least squares.

762 Econometrics II

Topics include time series and robust variance estimation.

765 Mathematical Methods

This course provides a systematic review of mathematical and statistical methods commonly used in economic modeling.

766 Quantitative Methods 

Topics include methods of seasonal adjustment, alternative forecasting techniques, price indexes, demographic modeling and projection, interpreting econometric models, and input-output analysis.

768 Advanced Econometrics

This course builds on the material in ECON 761 and ECON 762. Topics may include: nonparametric estimation, robust estimation, asymptotictheory, econometric programming.

769 Applied Microeconometrics 

The main topic of the course is the application of econometric techniques to the study of household behaviour. Topics may include expenditure systems, the relationship of consumption patterns, labour supply, and savings behaviour, aggregation, price indices and household production. There are extensive illustrations employing household microdata.

770 Advanced Analysis of Survey Data 

The course is divided into two parts. The objective of Part I is to have students identify a suitable data set (research study) and develop a proposal describing their secondary analysis project. Students will be helped to develop their 1-2 page proposals which will include: the research question, a brief outline of its relevance and importance; identification of the appropriate data set(s); a brief statement about analytical approach to be used; and the identification of 3-4 key references. The instructors have access to several data sets that can be used for this course. This part will occur between October and December. There will be two class sessions-one in October and the other in November and the opportunity for two individual sessions. The objective of Part 2 is to complete the research paper (review of the literature, analysis of data, write-up and revision of the report) with the purpose of submitting the paper for review to a peer-reviewed journal. This part will occur between January-May and include 10 class sessions.

773 Economic Policy Analysis I

This course is the first semester of the two-semester sequence that will provide a grounding in policy processes, policy issues, and important institutional structures, in relevant policy sectors in Canada, and provide an introduction to the basic research designs appropriate for establishing causal relationships through program/policy evaluation.

774 Economic Policy Analysis II

This course is the second semester in the two-semester sequence in Economic Policy Analysis. It will survey more advanced issues in policy evaluation and culminate in a major policy project.

781 Labour Economics I

A survey of basic labour economics. Topics include labour demand, labour supply, and the determination of equilibrium wages in competitive markets. Sources of wage differentials in competitive markets, such as human capital investment and compensating differentials, are examined, as are the effects on labour markets of government policies such as minimum wages, immigration restrictions, occupational health and safety regulations, and subsidies to education.

782 Labour Economics II

This course surveys state-of-the-art research in labour economics. Recently covered topics include asymmetric information models of strikes; estimation of duration models; recent trends in wage structure, firm size, unionization, and self employment; the impact of international competition and technological change on labour markets; and modeling dynamic family labour supply decisions.

Prerequisite: *781

784 Industrial Organization

This course examines the strategic interactions of firms in markets, and their implications for firms’ profits and consumer welfare. The course provides analytical concepts for analyzing firm behavior in different market structures. The course has two main goals: (i) introduce micro-economic and game-theoretic tools to understand competition and market power; (ii) develop an active understanding of econometric analysis of market power and competition. Both goals are illustrated with applications to competition policy and competitive strategy. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to develop and actively understand econometric analysis of market power and competition.

785 Economics of Human Resource Policies 

This course will study a current topic or theme in Human Resource Economics. State-of-the-art research will be surveyed, with an emphasis on the policy relevance of research. Possible themes include: the design of social insurance systems for unemployment, disability, or retirement; policies to foster human capital formation; methods for evaluating labour market interventions; the human resource policy implications of globalization, technological change, or aging populations.

788 Health Economics

This is a basic graduate survey course on the economics of health and health care. Topics include the organization, financing and utilization of health care services. Both theory and evidence relating to patterns of consumer and provider behaviour are examined, as are the functioning and regulation of “markets” for health services. Major public policy issues in the provision of health care in Canada are identified and the economic aspects of such issues are considered in detail.

791 Topics in Advanced Health Economics

This course focuses on issues relating to the economics of health and health care. It builds on ECON 788 and exposes students to more advanced topics and aspects of recent research in health economics. The specific topics presented depend on the instructors for each offering. Recent topics have included methods of economic evaluation and health technology assessment, the economics of work and health, the evaluation of health-care related interventions, advances in the empirical analysis of income and health inequalities, health human resources, and the evolution of health from childhood to adulthood.

Prerequisite: *788

793 Health Economic Policy

This course will study specific topics or theme areas of health economics. State-of-the-art research will be surveyed, with an emphasis on the policy relevance of research. Possible topics include the economics of health, health care financing, health care funding, the economics of the pharmaceutical sector, health and aging, and labour market experiences and health.

795 Analysis of Health Data 

This course is designed to introduce students to methods for the analysis of health data, with a particular focus on the use of survey datasets used in health-related micro-econometric research. Investigating features of health data requires the recognition of and methodology to cope with several characteristics not regularly (and rarely simultaneously) encountered in other areas. During the course, we will focus on the use of cross-sectional and longitudinal observational data to estimate causal parameters of interest and test hypotheses relevant to the econometric analysis of health data. At the end of the course, students should be able to perform their own econometric analyses of health data, and interpret and evaluate related studies.

796 Economics Co-op Work Term I

Students registered in either a Master or PhD program in the Department of Economics may optionally work a total of eight months in either one or two co-op placements.  Students must be registered in this course for the first four months of a co-op placement. This course is not for credit.

797 Economics Co-op Work Term II

Students registered in either a Master or PhD program in the Department of Economics may optionally work a total of eight months in either one or two co-op placements. Students must be registered in this course for the second four months of a co-op placement. This course is not for credit.

798 Workshop in Economics I

799 Workshop in Economics II

Economics Graduate Handbook MA in Economics Policy FAQs TA Handbook International Student Services Graduate Students Association Apply Now
For more information:
Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Graduate Program
KTH 426
905-525-9140 ext.24731
econgrd@mcmaster.ca
Length:
1 Year
Required Credential:
Honours B.A. in Economics
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
January 30

Ph.D.Doctor of Philosophy in Economics

The PhD program in economics prepares students to become professional, independent economic researchers applying state-of-the-art methods to analyze economic phenomena.

The PhD program in economics prepares students to become professional, independent economic researchers applying state-of-the-art methods to analyze economic phenomena.  Graduates primarily pursue one of two career tracks. One track is an academic career as a professor of economics.  We regularly place our graduates in academic positions, both in departments of economics and interdisciplinary settings with a strong economics focus, such as schools of public policy. A second track is a non-academic career in the public- or private-sector.  Again, we regularly place our graduates in good research positions within government ministries and agencies, such as the Department of Finance and Bank of Canada, as well as international organizations, and, less regularly, the private sector. Further information on placements of recent graduates can be found under Placements.

In addition to the research excellence of department faculty, faculty members lead or are affiliated with a number of research facilities and centres as McMaster that support economic research, including research by graduate students.  The Public Economics Data Analysis Laboratory (PEDAL) (A. Payne, Director), houses a wide range of confidential micro-data that can be used to support research in the areas of education, charities, and public services, with data holding expanding on a continuous basis.  The Statistics Canada Research Data Centre (RDC) (B. Spencer, Director), houses the masterfiles of a wide variety of Statistics Canada survey data plus an increasing array of public-sector administrative microdata (e.g., census data, vital statistics, employment data, justice system data) that support economic research.  The McMaster Experimental Economics Laboratory (McEEL) (S. Mestelman, Director), Canada’s first computer-mediated experimental economics laboratory, provides the capability for conducting controlled economic experiments across a wide range of fields in economics.  Importantly, the Faculty of Social Science is committed to building state-of-the-art empirical research facilities, including expanded facilities for the analysis of microdata and for the conduct of economic experiments, in the L.R.Wilson Hall, which will open in September 2015. 

Historically the department has been especially strong in empirical microeconomics, including labour economics, public economics, health economics, and population economics, but a series of recent hires has notably increased our strengths in the areas of international macroeconomics, international trade and international finance.

We usually admit 5-8 PhD students each year which, combined with our limited Masters enrollments, leads to small class sizes and substantial interaction between students and faculty.

Students in the Ph.D. program who have successfully completed the comprehensive examinations may apply for the co-op option associated with this degree program.

Coursework

A doctoral candidate must complete the following coursework: 

  • both microeconomic theory courses (Economics 721** and 722)
  • both macroeconomic theory courses (Economics 723** and 724)
  • both econometrics courses (Economics 761* and 762)
  • approximately eight one-term electives 

Students entering the PhD program from our MA in Economics program will already have completed the required courses and two electives; such students would require approximately six more electives. Students entering the PhD program from another university may be given credit for Economics 761 provide they pass the econometrics waiver exam.  Electives must be chosen so that the student satisfies the coursework requirements of his or her chosen fields for comprehensive exams (see the list below).  Most electives are chosen from those offered by the department of economics, but a student is allowed to take up to two one-term graduate courses offered by other departments, with the approval of the graduate chair (economics) and of the course instructor. Students in recent years, for example, have taken finance courses offered by the DeGroote School of Business, health-related courses offered by the Faculty of Health Sciences, and statistics courses offered by the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.

Comprehensive Exams

Completion of the degree requires that a student pass comprehensive exams in microeconomic theory, macroeconomic theory and two fields. Currently the available fields are:

  • Econometrics
  • Growth and Monetary Economics
  • Health Economics
  • International Economics
  • Labour Economics
  • Population Economics
  • Public Economics

The comprehensive exams in micro and macro theory are normally written in May or June following the satisfactory completion of the first year of coursework. Comprehensive field exams are normally written after the satisfactory completion of the second year of coursework. Candidates are allowed up to two attempts to pass each comprehensive exam. Students must complete the micro and macro theory comprehensive exams within 18 months of starting the program. All comprehensive exams must be completed within 24 months of starting the program. Co-op Option Students in the Ph.D program who have successfully completed the comprehensive examinations may apply for the co-op option associated with this degree program. The number of students who will be accepted will be small and will depend on available placements.  To complete the Ph.D. co-op option, the student must work a total of eight months in either one or two placements and successfully complete both ECON 796 Economics Co-op Work Term I and ECON 797 Economics Co-op Work Term II. PhD Thesis Students have wide latitude in their choice of thesis topic, but each topic must be approved by a supervisory committee consisting of three faculty members. Students at the thesis stage must attend the graduate students’ workshop (Economics 798 and 799) and give several presentations on their research. Once a thesis has been submitted, the student must defend his or her work at an oral examination. Note:

  • *A student who has a particularly strong background in econometrics can elect to write the econometrics waiver exam. Students who pass the waiver exam are allowed to replace economics 761 (term 1 of econometrics) with an elective course. Such students take economics 762 in term 2 and complete the econometrics project. Credit for economics 761 will appear on their transcripts.
  • **All students registering in economics 721 (Micro Theory 1) or 723 (Macro Theory 1) are required to take the mathematics preparation course Economics 765, an intensive four-day refresher course in mathematics. This course is given in early September, just prior to the start of regular graduate courses for the fall term. After the completion of this course, students are tested regarding their mathematics preparation, and a student’s score on this exam counts as 10% of the student’s final grade in economics 721 (micro theory) and in economics 723 (macro theory). 

 

Admission Requirements for the Ph.D. Program

As a minimum, a standard Canadian entrant into our PhD program will have a Masters degree in economics from a recognized university and will have maintained B+ average in their master’s study. We emphasize that these are minimum standards; those admitted typically have stronger academic records.

Students from foreign universities are expected to have equivalent backgrounds. Although equivalency is difficult to determine, here are some guidelines for a few countries from which we commonly receive inquiries:

  • India: First class standing for the Bachelors degree and upper-second-class standing in the Masters degree.
  • Bangladesh and Pakistan: First-class standing in both the bachelors and masters degrees.
  • China: A four-year degree with an average of at least 85%. The subject area must be ECONOMICS, not business. Strong skills in mathematics and statistics/econometrics are expected.

A student whose native language is not English, and who has not completed an English-language degree in a predominantly English-speaking country, must submit a TOEFL or IELTS score. The minimum acceptable TOEFL score for the Dept of Economics is 580 (237 on the computerized exam; 92 iBT); the minimum acceptable IELTS score is 7+.  Please note, the minimum requirement for the Dept of Economics is higher than the School of Graduate Studies minimum of 6.5.

If you have any questions email them to econgrd@mcmaster.ca. Please be patient all emails will be answered.

Required Document Checklist

  • Application Form and Fee
  • Two letters of reference
  • Academic transcripts
  • Statement of interest
  • Writing Sample (Paper or Essay)
  • CV/ Resume

For more information on this program please visit our FAQ's section for the PhD in Economics.

Information on Graduate Program fees can be found on the Student Accounts and Cashier's website. To visit this page, click here.

Financial Aid

Internal

Students to whom we offer admission are automatically considered for financial assistance – no special forms need be filled out. Funding is awarded on academic excellence and the availability of funds. Funding is open to all domestic and international students.

All students admitted to the PhD program are offered two forms of financial assistance. The first is a Teaching Assistant (TA) position, which normally requires the student to perform 130 hours of marking or tutoring in each of the fall and winter terms. The second is scholarship support. In addition, many upper-year PhD students receive support in the form of a Research Assistantship (RA) in lieu of a TA, in which they work on a research project with a faculty member. The minimum annual financial assistance provided to a PhD student is $17,500 during each of first four years of doctoral study. If a student’s study extends beyond four years, financial assistance as a TA or RA may be available, but it is not guaranteed. Finally, in addition to the financial assistance provided in a letter of offer, students are eligible for TA and RA positions during the spring and summer terms, which provides support above that available during the Fall and Winter terms.

External

Trudeau Scholarship: Students in the 1st or 2nd year of the doctoral program or those applying to the doctoral program are eligible. For more information regarding eligibility and the application process, please click here.

Additional information on external scholarship support can be found at the following sites:

 

Economics Graduate Handbook PhD in Economics FAQs TA Handbook International Student Services Graduate Students Association Apply Now
For more information:
Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics, Graduate Program
KTH 426
905-525-9140 ext.24731
econgrd@mcmaster.ca
Length:
4 Years
Required Credential:
Masters degree in economics from a recognized university
Program Type:
Thesis based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
January 30